Exhibitions


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 © Ellen Jacob

Ellen Jacob's photographs of her friend Kay in the final stretch are currently showing at Soho Photo, here in New York City. In a personal yet completely relatable journey for the photographer, and following Kay's journey to the end which reflects so many inevitable others, she produced a quiet series, showing how her friend held herself dealing with terminal cancer. 

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"Life and death, the fragility of human connections, the certainty of the end; all are joined to what our spirits manifest as we confront our greatest losses, whether in our past, future or the elusive boundary between them - this precise moment.

"Waiting Room is a foray into this territory we all share. We know death is waiting; yet we persist. This work explores the waiting, the persistence and the places we live while dying. Places largely separated from life.

"Waiting Room project is about Kay. She was 54. She was dying of cancer. She soon found herself partly paralyzed. I visited her often. Everyone approaches death differently. Kay had an amazing dignity that grew from her acceptance of her situation. She knew she was dying; she could barely move. She knew her life was circumscribed by a bed on the 12th floor of a Manhattan nursing home.

"Sometimes Kay was happy, sometimes sad, sometimes angry. Dying, she remained very much alive. Waiting Room is the story of Kay's time at the boundary between life and death and the place where she spent that time. Through Kay's story, I tell the story of all of us." Ellen Jacob.

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All images © Ellen Jacob
Exhibitions, Photographers | Permalink |


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© Nancy Baron

Coming next month from Kehrer is a cracking-looking book of photographs by Nancy Baron made in and around Palm Springs, a desert resort city about 100 miles east of Los Angeles in California.

"For most people, Palm Springs evokes images of a resort town of exquisite homes, glittering swimming pools, lush palm trees, and stunning golf courses where the rich and famous go to relax and retire. For others, Palm Springs signifies a town that has faded with time along with the passing of a long procession of A-list celebrities that flocked there during the mid 20th century from Hollywood elite like Bing Crosby, Lucille Ball and Bob Hope, to Presidents from Eisenhower to Ford to Reagan."

According to Wikipedia, Palm Springs has one of the highest concentration of same-sex couples of any community in the United States. Aren't any of them working as interior designers?

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There will be a solo show at the dnj Gallery in Santa Monica's Bergamot Station from September 6 - November 1, 2014, with an opening reception and book signing September 6, 6-8pm. 

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All images © Nancy Baron
Books, Exhibitions | Permalink |


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When his meds allow, Tilney1's creative outlets are poetry and drawing. They help him process the ongoing stories racing around in his head. © J A Mortram

In case you still haven't heard of J A Mortram and his series "Small Town Inertia," (where have you been??) Jim photographs people living in and around his local community in East Anglia, UK. Or rather, Jim spends time with his fellow humans, engages with their mostly-difficult lives, helps, supports, and makes photographs with, his neighbours.

A new exhibition opens on August 29th, 2014, at Camden Image Gallery in London, with a private view on the 28th. If you care about me at all, and you live in London, you will go see it.

Jim is also a member of Aletheia Photos, an independent collective of documentarians.

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David was recently blinded in a freak bike accident. Then his mother, on whom he relied, passed away.


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From a story on social housing

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Carl struggles daily with bullying. His mother died when he was very young and now his grandmother is sick.

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Helena tries to cope with mental, physical and sexual abuse

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The Peoples' Picnic give a sarnie to Grant.

All images © J A Mortram
Exhibitions | Permalink |


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© Valdir Cruz

Whilst not trying to wish away the coming few weeks of summer, this is something to look forward to in New York in September. Throckmorton Fine Art will open documentary photographer Valdir Cruz' sixth exhibition at their gallery. It is the culmination of a thirty-year-long photographic essay: 'Guarapuava,' about the photographer's hometown in Brazil. 

"I could use my photography to honor the people and the landscape of my youth. I like to think that their part in the history of Brazil is now a little more visible."

Valdir Cruz' bodies of work are so rich, you should check out more on his website.

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The blurb:
It has been said that Cruz's interest in photography began when he first viewed some of George Stone's photographs in National Geographic magazines in the 1970s. "Stone was a master teacher and it is thanks to him that I became a photographer." Cruz adds that it was George Tice who helped him become a good printer. At the Germain School he studied photography, but he gained technical skills from George Tice at the New School for Social Research, in New York. He later collaborated with Tice in the authorized production of two important Edward Steichen portfolios, Juxtapositions (1986) and Blue Skies (1987) before focusing largely on his own works. Valdir Cruz developed a deep understanding of how 20th century photographers such as Edward Steichen and Horst P. Horst expressed their creativity in photography. He says, "Mr Horst was not only a great photographer, but a gentleman. I remember the 80's with affection. Those were years of learning and growing tremendously in my vision -  and photography - and in my life!  Those were the years dedicated to New York City...and learning photography."  Valdir Cruz's work has been the subject of more than fifty solo exhibitions.

'Guarapuava' is on view at Throckmorton, 145 East 57th St, NYC, from September 18th to November 1st, 2014.

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All images © Valdir Cruz
Exhibitions | Permalink |


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"How do you sleep at night?" © Vincent Lawson

News from the south: September 12th, 2014, marks the opening of an exhibition of photographs by Mobile, Alabama-based photographer Vincent Lawson, at the Mobile Arts Council. Add Vincent to the list of lovable artists I met in New Orleans last year; I wasn't able to review his portfolio but we connected regardless. Look Vincent in the eyes and you can sense he's going to be invested in producing photographs like this.

"It is my goal that this project will help those who have little or nothing, whose dreams have been shattered, who think that no one cares for them, who think that they don't matter. If this project can change one person's way of thinking it will be a success."

Sorry I can't make it - share with someone who you think can!

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"These photographs also ask a question: if you see another human being in need, will you pass them by or help them? The two choices: Empathy / Apathy." - VL.

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All images © Vincent Lawson
Exhibitions, Photographers | Permalink |


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© Rahul Talukder

I am deeply humbled to have received communication from Shahidul Alam regarding the exhibition 1134 Lives Not Numbers, a group show dedicated to the lost garment workers of Bangladesh, which opened yesterday at Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka. 

"This 24th April will mark a year of Rana Plaza collapse and death of a thousand workers, thousand dreams. To observe this day, Artist practicing in different mediums including Photography, Installation, Performance Art, Sound, Film, Theater & Music will be holding a group exhibition." 

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© Rahul Talukder

A CBS news article said today "...promises of compensation for survivors of the disaster and the victims' families have been only partially kept, according to Human Rights Watch. The non-governmental organization says a financial trust fund, chaired by the International Labour Organization, was targeted to receive $40 million from global companies that purchased products from the Rana Plaza factories. However, only $15 million has been contributed so far. 

"The group also says none of the 15 international retailers whose clothing and brand labels were found in the rubble of the factory by journalists and labor activists have donated to the fund."


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Bangladeshi garment worker Mariyam, 30, who worked on the 6th floor of Rana Plaza, with her sister at Enam Medical College, in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. Mariyam had her right arm amputated to free her from the rubble when she was rescued nearly 72 hours after the building collapsed. © Suvra Kanti Das

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Bangladeshi garment worker Aroti, 16, who worked on the 5th floor of Rana Plaza, at Enam Medical College Hospital, Savar, Bangladesh. © Suvra Kanti Das

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© Suvra Kanti Das

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Siraj Uddin and Majeda Khatun, parents of New Wave Style factory's worker Shirin, 18, have found their beloved daughter's dead body in the morgue after 12 days. © Taslima Akhter

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Poly Akhter's mother, Shahana, grieves for her. Her other daughter, Dalia, also worked in the factory complex but did not go to work on the day of the collapse. © Taslima Akhter

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"Day 9: I was waiting on the backside of the building when demolition started with heavy machines and rubbles were removed then suddenly I saw few bodies were hanging." © Tushikur Rahman

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© Abir Abdullah

Please share the news about this exhibition.
Exhibitions | Permalink |


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New York, 1964 World's Fair, "Peace Through Understanding" Unisphere, 2009 © Jade Doskow

Dear friend of aCurator, a personal favourite, delightful Jade Doskow has been producing images of World's Fair sites around the US, and other countries, over the last few years. 

Wall Space Gallery in Santa Barbara, California, is pleased to announce that Jade will be in the gallery on Saturday, April 19th, at 2 pm, to discuss her 'Lost Utopia' project, which looks at current uses for, and remnants of, World's Fair Sites.

And it's the 50th anniversary of the New York Unisphere this month. Buy a print in celebration! 

"Driving West into New York City on the Long Island Expressway after passing nondescript strip malls and housing complexes, something unexpected appears on the horizon in the middle of a park green. A humongous steel globe towers over the park below, and beyond that looms a gigantic ovoid structure, supported by trunky concrete columns and painted in bold red and yellow. Receding beyond it are two towers that could best be described as supernatural landing pads. This is not a sci-fi movie set, but rather the site of the 1964 World's Fair in Flushing Meadows, Queens, New York. The globe is the icon from this event, the Unisphere (weighing in at 900,000 pounds of solid steel) and the other structure is the New York State Pavilion, designed by Philip Johnson." Jade Doskow.

Check out more of the World's Fair sites in Jade's full screen aCurator feature.
Exhibitions | Permalink |


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Flintshire, from the series 'Brighter Later' © Brian David Stevens

A Fine Beginning is a collective showcasing contemporary photography made in Wales. Their exhibition, "Made in Wales," features 17 artists, including friend of aCurator and generally top man, Brian David Stevens. Mark your calendars for March 14, 2014.

"A Fine Beginning, from which this collective takes its name, is the first chapter of Dylan Thomas' unfinished novel Adventures in the Skin Trade. The central character of the story leaves his parents home in South Wales for Paddington Station and when asked where he's going, Samuel Bennett replies, 'I don't know where I'm going, I haven't any idea in the world, that's why I came to London'."

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See Stevens' feature on Billy Childish; his Remembrance Day project They That Are Left; and Portraits.
Exhibitions | Permalink |


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One of my faves, Kate Simon. London go see.

Plus there's the exhibition of Burroughs' own photography through end of March at the Photographers' Gallery.

Exhibitions | Permalink |


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We love interdisciplinary artist Riitta Ikonen. Images from across here work were included in a feature in the aCurator magazine a couple of years ago. I'm thrilled to see Riitta keeping her images fresh and out there. Share with your Norwegian friends!
Exhibitions | Permalink |



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