Francisco Salgueiro IMG_1299-Edit-2-2.jpg

© Francisco Salgueiro

Francisco Salgueiro is a photographer and author based in Europe. This is an ongoing series of images made backstage at regional circuses all around Portugal. So far he's clocked 6 months and 8 circuses and a bunch of cool shots. Do check out his website for some other interesting, behind-the-scenes work.

Francisco Salgueiro IMG_1197-2.jpg

Francisco Salgueiro IMG_2204-Edit-2-2.jpg

Francisco Salgueiro IMG_1660-Edit-Edit.jpg

Francisco Salgueiro IMG_1443.jpg

Francisco Salgueiro IMG_6038-Edit-9.jpg

Francisco Salgueiro IMG_0234-Edit-3.jpg

All images © Francisco Salgueiro
Photographers | Permalink |


Evelina Reinhart Coconut-Seafood-Soup_9.jpg

Coconut seafood soup © Evelina Reinhart

Here's a complete package masquerading as a thesis project, from SVA Digital Photo grad Evelina Reinhart. Evelina suffers from acid-reflux disease and found most of the recipes already out there were not to her taste. So, she made up her own, had the dishes cooked up, and photographed them all using only natural light. Smart! The book, The Joy of Eating, is available for purchase so why not buy one for someone you know who has the same issues.


Evelina Reinhart Shrimp-Dumplings_11.jpg

Shrimp dumplings

Evelina Reinhart Eggplant-Rollatini_7.jpg

Eggplant rollatini

Evelina Reinhart Four-Topping-Pizza_1.jpg

Four toppings pizza

Evelina Reinhart Corn-Cake_8.jpg

Corn cake

Evelina Reinhart Green-Tea-Ice-Cream_10.jpg

Green tea ice cream. All images © Evelina Reinhart

ER-cookbook-cover.jpg

Photographers | Permalink |


Michael_Massaia_Batman.jpg

Batman, from the Melting Ice Pops series © Michael Massaia

Remember that sinking feeling when your lolly falls to the ground in slow-motion? I guess someone dropped theirs in the gents', inspiring the wonderful machine that is Michael Massaia to make this, his second summer series released so far this year. They are fantastic. Using a $40,000 Leica loaner, Michael Massaia's latest project entails placing ice pops on a piece of black Plexi, allowing them to melt in their own time, and photographing them using only long exposures. 

View the full-screen magazine photo feature.

Check out his sculptural sunbathers, burnt to black in Deep in a Dream: Sheep Meadow.
Photographers | Permalink |


Adam_Void_LTD2_01.jpg

Freight-hopping in the Appalachians © Adam Void

I happily scored an original piece of art by Adam Void at Visual AIDS' Postcards from the Edge in NYC last year - it's a well-loved event, first come-first served, you choose from anonymous artworks, you pays a little money and then discover who the artist is. Adam reached out to me soon after and has kept me updated on his multi-media artistic wanderings.

In some of his Polaroid work he travels the States shooting with the Fuji Instax (which I adore), hopping trains or driving with his mates, shooting landscapes, graffiti and so on. Here are just a few selects from his growing body of work. According to his bio, he has a BA in Existential Philosophy which makes him a right geezer in my book (that's a good thing from a Brit). He describes his work as "transform(ing) the debris of contemporary society into works that address social & political issues of class, control, and community. He is dedicated to exploring the details of countercultures particular to his experience: DIY culture, graffiti, hard traveling, social activism, mysticism, and the concept of "the outsider."" 

Mr. Void has an exhibition on through July 26th, 2014, at Castell in Asheville, NC where you could see more. Or visit his website.

Adam_Void_LTD4_01.jpg

Adam_Void_LTD4.jpg

Adam_Void_dan-wiitz.jpg

Adam_Void_12.jpg

Adam_Void_8.jpg

Adam_Void_9.jpg

Adam_Void_13.jpg

All images © Adam Void
Photographers | Permalink |


Brian_David_Stevens_05.jpg


I'm loving the idea of this limited edition boxed set of prints by friend-of-aCurator Brian David Stevens, for only £100 (that's about $170 on today's crappy exchange rate. But still a billy bargain!) 

"In the summer of 2004 photographer Stevens rose early to capture the towering speaker rigs and sound systems of the Notting Hill Carnival before the crowds arrived." Read on...

Brian_David_Stevens_04.jpg

"The sound systems, these towering monuments to volume that stay in place for three days, are portrayed starkly and simply in Stevens' photos, a far cry from the colourful, loud and crowded images that normally depict the carnival. Stevens says he wanted to shift the emphasis to the source of the music that was drawing people there in the first place, and yet was drowned out in the visual noise. "Normally you never see these streets empty, they're absolutely packed with people," he says. "I got down there very early as they were setting up and shot the huge, monolithic speakers just in the middle of the street, where they look fantastically beautiful - I think every street corner should have one on them."

(Independent publisher) Tartaruga has produced a limited boxed set of screenprints, featuring six photographs from the series screenprinted as A2 monochrome prints on to high quality archival paper.

The six prints are produced in a limited run of just 30, and come housed inside a custom printed box. 

A limited photo book / zine of the series is soon to be available from Café Royal Books, and an exhibition of the series (screenprinted by Tartaruga) is on show at The Social in London until 30 Sept 2014.

Brian_David_Stevens_16.jpg

Brian_David_Stevens_18.jpg

Brian_David_Stevens_bs_2.jpg

All images © Brian David Stevens
Photographers | Permalink |


Jason_Wilde.jpg

© Jason Wilde

There were so many great entries for the outdoor photo installation The Fence, now up in Brooklyn and Atlanta, and with such a limited number of spots available, a bunch of photographs that I loved didn't make the finals. Jason Wilde was the first person I contacted when the judging had finished - I was additionally compelled by his photo of spare ribs being eaten in the bath, and we ended up meeting on a hot day in London to talk life the universe and everything. 

Jason has been collecting notes found lying around the ever-diversifying north London housing estate where he has lived for 17 years. "Built in the 1950s, the Clarence Way estate has been a focal point of London's rapidly shifting social landscape, housing people from within Britain and abroad who have been affected by any number of diverse events and circumstances. Located a few minutes' walk north of Camden Town underground station, the six orange brick blocks that make up the estate house 1297 people (2011 census) in 354 various-sized units."

"I have witnessed the rapid diversification of the cultural mix of his community. In an attempt to record this transformation, in 2003 I started collecting handwritten notes that he found discarded on the estate. On one level, these salvaged texts are simple records of the everyday; they function to remind, instruct, organise and explain. They tell of journeys planned and taken, and list items to purchase and food to take away. Some make grand political and philosophical statements whilst others are simply mysterious."

"I have photographed these once-private texts against wallpaper backgrounds, transforming them into imaginative triggers that hint at the realities of life for a diverse group of people. These individual combinations form 'Silly Arse Broke It,' an ongoing and open-ended narrative that invites the viewer to contemplate a small inner-city community that is a microcosm for the social flux and cultural (dis)integration that characterises Britain in the 21st century." 

Go full screen for maximum magazine photo feature enjoyment.

News update: Jason was accepted to the Guernsey Photo Festival later this year, and was a winner at PhotoIreland's portfolio contest. 
Also: take a look at Jason's fabulous free portrait studio - he has made over 1500 portraits of strangers. 
Magazine | Permalink |


Bilo_Hussein_Ece-Turkey.jpg

Ece, Turkey. © Bilo Hussein

Bilo Hussein is one of the delightful and impressive students from NY's School of Visual Arts I met during the class thesis review this year. Here are a few images from her heartfelt series "Never Home."

"When I was growing up in Saudi Arabia, my Sudanese parents often reminded me that the country we lived in was not our home. It was only years later that I understood the implications of this - that it might become impossible for me to 'belong' to any culture and that there was no place I could comfortably call home."

"Never Home is an ongoing project driven by the sense of segregation in religion, culture and gender that I experienced as a child in Saudi Arabia. I also express my continuing wish to find a place where I can fit in regardless of belief."

Bilo_Hussein_Sakura-Japan.jpg

Sakura, Japan

"As I went on to arrange and shoot the portraits, I directed my subjects to think about their formative experience in their culture of origin - on the good and the bad. I found myself almost subconsciously placing them next to a window, for reasons beyond its value as a light source. I came to the realization that they were really me sitting by the window as a child, locked up in our house in Jeddah wondering if I were ever to leave this place if would find another land I could honestly call home."

Bilo_Hussein_Ailin-Ecuador.jpg

Ailin, Ecuador

Of course, she found much in common with the women she chose to photograph, all transplants from elsewhere, domestic and abroad. In post-production, Bilo layers images of New York that are significant to her and textures that relate to the person's original home. Simply lovely.

Bilo_Hussein_Solah-Korea.jpg  

Solah, Korea

Bilo_Hussein_Sharron-USA.jpg

Sharron, USA. All images © Bilo Hussein
Photographers | Permalink |


Karsh_Wiesel_Elie_01.jpg

Elie Wiesel © Yousuf Karsh

Yousuf Karsh "American Portraits" exhibition is still on at the National Portrait Gallery in DC through November 4th, 2014. A representative of the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity got in touch having just seen the Wiesel portrait which is on view. The exhibition includes the colour image, but here is a black and white for good measure.

Karsh stopped working in 1992, and Mr Wiesel was among the last people photographed. Although, 1991 was still an interesting year - he also photographed Cesar Chavez, Marilyn Horne, Arnold Palmer, David Rockefeller, and Billy Wilder.

Karsh_Wiesel_Elie_02.jpg

© Yousuf Karsh
Karsh | Permalink |


Biarritz_Deathbed.jpg

Biarritz © Pej Behdarvand

LA-based photographer Pej Behdarvand's assignment for Car & Driver magazine, to record a BMW's final moments, ("Our Bimmer Gets Gutted") progressed into his brilliant series "Deathbed." Some of the absolute best work I see is made as "personal work" when the photographer takes their idea and executes it under their own steam. Successful projects like this can then boost a photographer's assignment work and gain them important exposure both inside and outside of the photography world.

Metro_Deathbed.jpg

Metro

Instead of shooting the cars in the grave junk yard, Behdarvand isolated them on a black fabric backdrop, rendering them emotionally discomfiting. They are only cars, not even one you yourself have owned, yet they pull on your heartstrings and their last gasp is almost audible! Behdarvand says:

"The vehicles in this photo series are depicted as if museum objects, yet unlike museum objects these wrecked cars are not to be physically preserved intact for posterity, but will be crushed for reuse in another form. The photo is the only document of the auto in this unique, temporary state: after its useful life, before it is reincarnated into recyclable material. What information is captured in these images? A glimpse of the nebulous phase of a manmade thing, with remnants of brand choice and societal status, with evidence of family and pride, categorized indifferently with grease-pencil marks. In Deathbed, the photo is a relic, a relic of a car relinquished to the junkyard to be held until it is no longer a car."

Pej_Behdarvand Wagoneer_Deathbed.jpg

Wagoneer

Pej_Behdarvand Wrangler_Deathbed.jpg

Wrangler

Pej_Behdarvand Honda_Deathbed.jpg

Honda

Pej_Behdarvand Taxi_Deathbed.jpg

All images © Pej Behdarvand
Photographers | Permalink |


TerriGold_28_blog.jpg

© Terri Gold

In Terri Gold's ongoing series she explores "universal cross-cultural truths," capturing the traditions of disappearing indigenous cultures. The Omo Valley is in southern Ethiopia, in Africa's Great Rift Valley. It is known for its culture and diversity and for the discovery there of the earliest human fossils.

Terri's final prints are really beautiful. She uses very particular processes, which she describes: "I use a specially converted infrared digital camera and the digital darkroom to create my split-toned imagery. There is a mysterious quality to the invisible, iridescent world of infrared light that illuminates another dimension. When shooting, processing, and printing an infrared image, one must be open to the journey that reveals the subtle colors within. I enjoy the unexpected elements that arise when working with light beyond what the eyes can see. I also pursue the unexpected through multimedia, and often paint with encaustic wax and oils on the surface of my prints. Instead of photographic realism, I think of the work as magical realism."

But I do also think these images lend themselves extra-well to being back-lit, too! View the full-screen magazine photo feature.

View Terri's previous feature "Still Points in a Turning World," published August, 2010.
Magazine | Permalink |



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10