Guillermo-De-Angelis-Etiología.jpg

Etiología © Guillermo De Angelis

Diegesis is a gorgeous series of abstract images from mysterious artist Guillermo De Angelis.

Diegesis is a style of fiction storytelling which presents an interior view of a world and is
that world itself experienced by the characters in situations and events of the narrative.

"After doing architecture, design and philosophy I dove into photography. With the sort of enthusiasm that drives you to move forward, or better still, inwards. Hoping to discover within, rather than outside myself, what I am trying to show. I choose to take pictures not prepared. I try to get the expression through the economy of resources. Focusing on the details that strike me as essential. Suggesting clearly, presenting without describing."

Guillermo-De-Angelis-XI.jpg

XI

Guillermo-De-Angelis-DelayIV.jpg

Delay IV

Guillermo-De-Angelis-La-soledad.jpg

La soledad

Guillermo-De-Angelis-Tramontana.jpg

Tramontana

Guillermo-De-Angelis-DelayIII.jpg

Delay III
All images © Guillermo De Angelis
Photographers | Permalink |


christine-anderson_tom-0515.jpg

Nelson Mandela Mouse © Christine Anderson

T'was a long hard winter on the east coast of the USA for all flora and fauna. Christine Anderson tells a tale of two mice and their attempts to escape their captors in New Jersey. 

christine-anderson_tom-0539.jpg

Of course, Christine was in fact having a laugh, as she rescued and ultimately adopted the tiny buggers. A woman after my own heart. 

christine-anderson_tom-0573.jpg


christine-anderson_tom-0574.jpg

christine-anderson_tom-0582.jpg

All images © Christine Anderson
Photographers | Permalink |


Zeren_Badar_04.jpg

"Very First Accident" © Zeren Badar

There were so many images that I loved but was unable to include in the final eight for The Center for Photography in Woodstock's 'Photography Now!' exhibition this year. I had published Zeren Badar a couple of years ago here in the blog - I absolutely adore his Fire Island Invasion series. I really love these whacky still life images, too. Here's his spiel:

"I'm hugely influenced by dadaism and neo-dadaism for this photography project. I explore a peculiar combination of photography, painting & collage. I create three dimensional collages with found objects, food and cheaply printed old paintings. I turn pre-existing works of art into Duchampian ready-mades and take photographs of them."

Fabulous!

Zeren_Badar_03.jpg

"Lady Gaga"

Zeren_Badar_02.jpg

"Gluttony"

Zeren_Badar_01.jpg

"Endless Love"
All images © Zeren Badar

Zeren Badar on Instagram
Photographers | Permalink |


Jade_Doskow_WorldsFair.jpg

New York, 1964 World's Fair, "Peace Through Understanding" Unisphere, 2009 © Jade Doskow

Dear friend of aCurator, a personal favourite, delightful Jade Doskow has been producing images of World's Fair sites around the US, and other countries, over the last few years. 

Wall Space Gallery in Santa Barbara, California, is pleased to announce that Jade will be in the gallery on Saturday, April 19th, at 2 pm, to discuss her 'Lost Utopia' project, which looks at current uses for, and remnants of, World's Fair Sites.

And it's the 50th anniversary of the New York Unisphere this month. Buy a print in celebration! 

"Driving West into New York City on the Long Island Expressway after passing nondescript strip malls and housing complexes, something unexpected appears on the horizon in the middle of a park green. A humongous steel globe towers over the park below, and beyond that looms a gigantic ovoid structure, supported by trunky concrete columns and painted in bold red and yellow. Receding beyond it are two towers that could best be described as supernatural landing pads. This is not a sci-fi movie set, but rather the site of the 1964 World's Fair in Flushing Meadows, Queens, New York. The globe is the icon from this event, the Unisphere (weighing in at 900,000 pounds of solid steel) and the other structure is the New York State Pavilion, designed by Philip Johnson." Jade Doskow.

Check out more of the World's Fair sites in Jade's full screen aCurator feature.
Exhibitions | Permalink |


Vanessa_Ahlsborn_Machete_Project.jpg

Daw Thaw Yin with her machete, and daily cheroot, Myanmar, 2011. From "The Machete Project" © Vanessa Ahlsborn

In 2006 Vanessa Ahlsborn bought her first knife as a memento whilst traveling. Since then her interest in the utilitarian tools has led her around the world producing this simply wonderful personal project. I think Vanessa is destined for greatness!

"The Machete Project is an ongoing portrait and object archive that showcases the diversity of this blade style and the beauty of its users. Despite their fearsome reputation in western news media and popular culture, the machete is an extremely versatile and commonplace asset for many people across the world. By documenting the everyday user for whom the machete is an invaluable tool, the project seeks to question the viewer's assumptions about the machete, and by extension, the people who use it."

View the glorious full-screen magazine photo feature

Vanessa_Ahlsborn_Machete_Project-01.jpg

© Vanessa Ahlsborn
Magazine | Permalink |


somewhere_in_the_west_30s-Marc-Yankus.jpg

Somewhere in the West Thirties © Marc Yankus

Marc Yankus is a photographer and graphic artist. In his latest body of work, "The Space Between," he presents New York's architecture in an imaginary, yet hyper-real way.

Marc sees things differently; we talked about him having almost synesthesic moments as he walks around New York. His photographs are a result of his vision and precise post-production, and invoke a nostalgia that on the whole, New York has no time for (though I believe the new mayor is being lobbied to create a listed buildings register for those over 75 years old.) He adds more depth by layering images over antique textured paper.

"I'm drawn to the majestic details and materials of classical historical buildings, many of which are hidden from view, tucked behind new architecture. In these instances, a mere sliver of old, of history, is there to be photographed, leaving me to recreate the rest of the building to make it whole again."

There are 21 photographs in Marc's upcoming solo exhibition at ClampArt in Chelsea, New York, which opens April 3, 2014.

View the full-screen magazine photo feature.
Magazine | Permalink |


Michael_Bach_04.jpg

© Michael Bach

Michael Bach is a photographer who enjoys modeling for other artists. But Michael has suffered a plethora of serious health issues during his lifetime and as the effects of multiple disorders increases, he has found this posing becoming increasingly challenging. To help process that, he made a series of self-portraits, saying: "I became intrigued with the idea of photographing myself in this process of decay, both on a personal level and displayed on the modeling stand in a predetermined pose and time interval." Michael tries to maintain half-hour exposures to capture all his tics.

I see strength in his photos,and ownership of his situation, and admirable braveness!

Michael_Bach_01.jpg

Michael_Bach_03.jpg

Michael_Bach_02.jpg

All images © Michael Bach
Photographers | Permalink |


Alessandro-Falco-old_pope-(1-di-1).jpg

old_pope. Image by Alessandro Falco

I'm wary of camera-in-front-of-Google-maps projects but I always have time for people whose work I've published in the past, and Alessandro Falco has kept in touch with me since our paths crossed when he entered the International Fine Art Photography Competition a couple of years ago. I think this project is a good one, entertaining. Alessandro is a smart guy, check out his other work.

"Today an experience seems to be truly lived only if with a chance of sharing it in order to obtain approbation, and this is the next step of a consumer society. We are overwhelmed by images, and the internet is the place where this huge amount is left after receiving few or many likes/views/comments. 

"This work aims to present a new socio-cultural trend describing it in a provocative way, showing instead Google earth's photo icons. The main touristic destinations thus become a sort of digital landfill, and it lends to considerations of different nature, including the hypothetical conflict between amateurs and pros, or between tourists and locals."

Alessandro-Falco-francelouvre-(1-di-1).jpg

france_louvre

Alessandro-Falco-guell-(1-di-1).jpg

guell

Alessandro-Falco-financialdistrictfromESB-(1-di-1).jpg

financialdistrict

Alessandro-Falco-summer_solstice_2011-(1-di-1).jpg

summer_solstice
Photographers | Permalink |


George_Holroyd_03.jpg

© George Holroyd

Something gentle to see you into your weekend, from George Holroyd, a US-born photographer, currently living in Hungary, by way of Paris, France. In his current adopted country, George is working on some new diptychs. I love George's consistently tranquil style. 

George_Holroyd_04.jpg

"My photography is a form of personal documentary. It is an investigation into those elements that occasionally coalesce in ones awareness to foster a sense of belonging or alienation. I attempt to illustrate these phenomena in my work, presenting images to the viewer that are consistent with my recollection."

George_Holroyd_01.jpg

George_Holroyd_06.jpg

George_Holroyd_05.jpg

George_Holroyd_02.jpg

George_Holroyd_07.jpg

All images © George Holroyd

See a previous post with some of George's diaristic earlier work.
Photographers | Permalink |


Walt-Stricklin-Rural-Churches.jpg

I published Walt Stricklin's gorgeous composite panoramas "Made in China" in the magazine almost three years ago now. Walt has stayed prolific in the meantime. Based in Alabama, Walt's been photographing rural churches and composing them thusly:

Walt-Stricklin-3-D-Bethlehem-Bapt.jpg

I love Walt's statement on the series:

"Being the son of a hell fire and brimstone Southern Baptist preacher and growing up in country churches across the South and southwest, this project would seem to be a natural fit. Unfortunately, my father and I never quite saw eye to eye on religion and for the most part, my religious views have not changed or softened. But, rambling through the backroads of the rural south has brought up feelings I had not expected.

I have had a conversion, not religious, more of a societal conversion. I started seeing things with the softer eyes of age. There is something special about rural church buildings. I am starting to understand the strength, comfort and sense of community they bring their congregations. Even the architecture seems to ground the soul in the common sense ways in which they are built. They have the feeling of country grandeur without overwhelming the sensibility of the rural lifestyle."
Photographers | Permalink |



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10